Publications

New Zealand Stream Invertebrates: Ecology and Implications for Management

Collier, K. J.; Winterbourn, M. J. 2000 Published by The New Zealand Limnological Society (NZFSS), Christchurch. 415 pp.

Introduction

New Zealand Stream Invertebrates is a comprehensive and readable
account of the biology and ecology of invertebrate animals living in
New Zealand streams and rivers. Invertebrates play key roles in the
ecology of running water ecosystems and are the principal foods of
fish and many water-associated birds. They are also used widely for
environmental monitoring and measuring the toxicity of effluents.
Although an extensive technical and scientific literature deals with many aspects of stream ecology in New Zealand, this is the first work that draws much of it together in a detailed and authoritative manner. The contributors are research scientists, academics and water managers who work with stream invertebrates.
The book comprises 15 chapters totalling over 400 pages. The first three provide an introduction to the New Zealand stream fauna, its biogeography, biodiversity, and special features, while five deal with fundamental aspects of ecology – life-histories, feeding, substrate relationships and habitat use. The last seven chapters examine applied topics including the effects of agriculture, mining, forestry, urban development, flow regulation and toxic substances on stream communities, as well as conservation issues and the role of invertebrates in stream monitoring and management.
New Zealand Stream Invertebrates: Ecology and Implications for Management includes extensive references to the original literature, comprehensive indexes and an eight page spread of colour photos.

About the editors:

Kevin Collier is a senior aquatic scientist at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in Hamilton.
Mike Winterbourn is Emeritus Professor of Zoology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch.
Production of New Zealand Stream Invertebrates: Ecology and Management Implications was generously sponsored by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA). Profits from sales will go to the New Zealand Freshwater Sciences Society.

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